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Compagnies and key players

Spanish Food Tech Novameat 3D Prints The ‘World’s Biggest Cell-Based Meat Prototype’

Barcelona-based food tech Novameat has managed to produce what it calls the largest whole cut cultivated meat prototype in the world. The startup, who have previously created 3D-printed plant-based meats and a vegan-friendly “steak” using its patented microextrusion technology, recently spoke to FoodNavigator about its latest developments. “Our biggest cell-based meat prototypes – or you can call them hybrid meat analogues, as we mix mammalian adipose cells with a biocompatible plant-based scaffold – score at 22500mm​³ in volume,” Novameat founder and CEO Scionti told the publication.

Source: Spanish Food Tech Novameat 3D Prints The ‘World’s Biggest Cell-Based Meat Prototype’

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Research

New Harvest Funds Australian Research on Cell-Based Crayfish Meat

An aquaculture researcher from the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) has secured a seed grant from US-based research institute New Harvest to develop cell-based crayfish meat.The grant recipient, Lisa Musgrove, will be using the funds to investigate crayfish growth factors and cell culture during her Honours degree in 2021, under the supervision of USC GeneCology Research Centre scientist, Dr. Tomer Ventura. Musgrove will be the first Australian to receive a grant from New Harvest, one of the only sources for funding academic research in cellular agriculture.

Source: New Harvest Funds Australian Research on Cell-Based Crayfish Meat | Protein Report

Categories
Events News

innFood Conference 2021, February 1st – 2nd, 2021

CiFOOD is one of the seven thematic, interdisciplinary centres at the Faculty of Technical Sciences at Aarhus University, aiming at connecting researchers from fields along the food supply chain – from innovative production of raw materials to consumer science and health aspects.With this conference we want to share our research activities within this field, and also highlight some of our strategic partners.

Source: innFood Conference 2021

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Market

Blind tasting 3D printed alternative meat: ‘It tastes and feels like meat’

Israeli start-up Redefine Meat has pulled off the ‘world’s largest’ blind taste test for its 3D printed meat alternative. The taste test targeted meat-eaters and the results are in. The company secured over a 90% acceptance rate.

Source: Blind tasting 3D printed alternative meat: ‘It tastes and feels like meat’

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News

Spanish government invests €5.2 million in cultured meat project

The project was selected by the Spanish Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI), which supports R&D projects of Spanish companies. San Sebastián-based BioTech Foods is a Spanish biotechnology company dedicated to the development of cultured meat from the cultivation of muscle cells previously extracted from animals.According to the company, cultivated meat is positioned as one of the greatest innovations of our century, integrating food safety, animal welfare and sustainability in a unique product aimed at all types of consumers.

Source: Spanish government invests €5.2 million in cultured meat project

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Research

Muscle stem cell isolation and in vitro culture for meat production: A methodological review

Cultured muscle tissue-based protein products, also known as cultured meat, are produced through in vitro myogenesis involving muscle stem cell culture and differentiation, and mature muscle cell processing for flavor and texture. This review focuses on the in vitro myogenesis for cultured meat production. The muscle stem cell-based in vitro muscle tissue production consists of a sequential process: (1) muscle sampling for stem cell collection, (2) muscle tissue dissociation and muscle stem cell isolation, (3) primary cell culture, (4) upscaled cell culture, (5) muscle differentiation and maturation, and (6) muscle tissue harvest. Although muscle stem cell research is a well-established field, the majority of these steps remain to be underoptimized to enable the in vitro creation of edible muscle-derived meat products. The profound understanding of the process would help not only cultured meat production but also business sectors that have been seeking new biomaterials for the food industry. In this review, we discuss comprehensively and in detail each step of cutting-edge methods for cultured meat production. This would be meaningful for both academia and industry to prepare for the new era of cellular agriculture.

Source: Muscle stem cell isolation and in vitro culture for meat production: A methodological review – PubMed

Categories
Compagnies and key players

Cell-cultured meat gamechanger? Matrix Meats to showcase nanofiber scaffolding in ‘solid meat product’ this year

Matrix Meats – an Ohio-based startup developing customizable nanofiber scaffolds for cell-cultured meat production – will showcase a prototype “solid meat product such as a thin piece of steak” in partnership with a cultured meat co by the end of this year as a demonstration of its technology, billed as a potential gamechanger in the nascent industry.

The beauty of Matrix Meats – which develops edible scaffolding around which cells can seed, creating meaty 3D structures – is that it enables firms to grow and proliferate cells (the first stage of any cell-cultured meat process) and then differentiate them into various cell types such as muscle and fat (the second stage of the process), much more rapidly… all in a single bioreactor.

Source: Cell-cultured meat gamechanger? Matrix Meats to showcase nanofiber scaffolding in ‘solid meat product’ this year

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News

Under Discussion: Aristotelian Temperance and Cultured Meat

Admittedly, I’m taking for granted here that the currently standard system of raising creatures in captivity and subjecting them to immense pain simply for the purpose of consuming their flesh is a moral abomination, regardless of how tasty that flesh might be. If cultured meat offers the most realistic opportunity to prevent widespread nonhuman animal suffering, then that alone is sufficient reason to explore its viability. But the implications of our diet for our character (and what we care about) is also important to consider, even once creaturely suffering is diminished.

Source: Under Discussion: Aristotelian Temperance and Cultured Meat – The Prindle Post

Categories
Research

The coverage of cultured meat in the US and UK traditional media, 2013-2019: drivers, sources, and competing narratives

‘Cultured’ meat has attracted a considerable amount of investor and media interest as an early-stage technology. Despite uncertainties about its future impact, news media may be contributing to promissory discourses, by stressing the potential benefits from cultured meat to the environment, health, animal welfare, and feeding a growing population. The results from a content analysis of 255 articles from 12 US and UK traditional media from 2013 to 2019 show that much of the coverage is prompted by the industry sector, whose representatives are also the most quoted. Positive narratives about cultured meat are much more prominent than cautionary ones. Our findings support previous scholarship on other emerging technologies which concluded that with important variations, media treatments are largely positive.

Source: The coverage of cultured meat in the US and UK traditional media, 2013-2019: drivers, sources, and competing narratives – PubMed

Categories
Market

Michelin Star Japanese Chef Launches Startup to Create Cultured Meat

But if you’re Chef Shimamura Masaharu of Japan, someone who writes that in high school he wondered whether to “to wear a cook’s lab coat or a scientist’s lab coat,” straddling the two worlds makes perfect sense.Which is why the chef/owner of Michelin-starred restaurant Unkaku has launched DiverseFarm, a joint venture with cell-ag technology company TissueByNet.

Source: Michelin Star Japanese Chef Launches Startup to Create Cultured Meat