Categories
Research

The Science Behind Grilling the Perfect Steak

Summer has arrived, and it’s time to fire up the backyard grill. Though many of us are trying to eat less beef for environmental reasons, it’s hard to resist indulging in an occasional steak — and you’ll want to make the most of the experience.So, what’s the best way to grill that steak? Science has some answers. Meat scientists (many of them, unsurprisingly, in Texas) have spent whole careers studying how to produce the tenderest, most flavorful beef possible. Much of what they’ve learned holds lessons only for cattle producers and processors, but a few of their findings can guide backyard grillmasters in their choice of meat and details of the grilling process.

Source: The Science Behind Grilling the Perfect Steak | Innovation | Smithsonian Magazine

Categories
Research

Animal-free heme production for artificial meat in Corynebacterium glutamicum via systems metabolic and membrane engineering

Recently, heme has attracted much attention as a main ingredient that mimics meat flavor in artificial meat in the food industry. Here, we developed Corynebacterium glutamicum capable of high-yield production of heme with systems metabolic engineering and modification of membrane surface.

Source: Animal-free heme production for artificial meat in Corynebacterium glutamicum via systems metabolic and membrane engineering – PubMed

Categories
Research

Bioethical considerations of cell-cultured meat – PubMed

Based on the analysis of the essence of cell cultured meat, we explore the positive significance of cell cultured meat technology for the meat production industry, consumer groups, and the sustainable development of mankind in the future. From the perspective of bioethics, the research, development and production of cell cultured meat can help ensure the sustainable development of human society, improve animal welfare, reduce resource demand, improve the nutritional function of meat products, and provide new growth points for the development of other industries. In addition, the ethical risks of food safety,

Source: [Bioethical considerations of cell-cultured meat] – PubMed

Categories
Research

Lab to Table: Identifying the Genes Responsible For Muscle Tissue Development in Cows

What distinguishes a muscle cell from a fat cell or a skin cell? The answer is “gene expression.” More precisely, the particular combination of genes that are “turned on or off” in a cell which dictates cellular morphology and function. Although genome sequencing and analysis has been employed vastly in the study of disease and pharmaceuticals, there has been little application in the emerging field of cellular agriculture.

Source: Lab to Table: Identifying the Genes Responsible For Muscle Tissue Development in Cows | Protein Report

Categories
Research

Chinese Consumers’ Attitudes and Potential Acceptance toward Artificial Meat – PubMed

The interest for artificial meat has recently expanded. However, from the literature, perception of artificial meat in China is not well known. A survey was thus carried out to investigate Chinese attitudes toward artificial meat. The answers of 4666 respondents concluded that 19.9% and 9.6% of them were definitely willing and unwilling to try artificial meat respectively, whereas 47.2% were not willing to eat it regularly, and 87.2% were willing to pay less for it compared to conventional meat

Source: Chinese Consumers’ Attitudes and Potential Acceptance toward Artificial Meat – PubMed

Categories
Research

Bioethical considerations of cell-cultured meat – PubMed

From the perspective of bioethics, the research, development and production of cell cultured meat can help ensure the sustainable development of human society, improve animal welfare, reduce resource demand, improve the nutritional function of meat products, and provide new growth points for the development of other industries. In addition, the ethical risks of food safety, technology abuse and technical supervision involved in cell cultured meat production are put forward for deep consideration, hoping to provide reference for the sustainable development of artificial meat industry from the perspective of bioethics.

Source: [Bioethical considerations of cell-cultured meat] – PubMed

Categories
Research

Decellularized spinach serves as an edible platform for laboratory-grown meat

Spinach, a cost-efficient and environmentally friendly scaffold, provided an edible platform upon which a team of researchers led by a Boston College engineer has grown meat cells, an advance that may accelerate the development of cultured meat, according to a new report in the advance online edition of the journal Food BioScience.

Source: Decellularized spinach serves as an edible platform for laboratory-grown meat | EurekAlert! Science News

Categories
Research

What’s the carbon footprint of lab-grown meat?

If a large new production facility runs on renewable energy, the carbon footprint of cultivated meat would be lower than conventional beef, pork, and chicken. The analysis calculates that the footprint is roughly 92% lower than beef, 52% lower than pork, and 17% lower than chicken, even if the conventional meat is produced in ways that are more sustainable than what’s standard now—for example, changing feed so cattle burp less methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

Source: What’s the carbon footprint of lab-grown meat?

Categories
Research

Researchers report new approach to cultured meat

“Using techniques developed for regenerative medicine, we succeeded in culturing millimeter-sized chunks of meat wherein alignment of the myotubes help mimic the texture and mouthfeel of steak. For this, myoblasts drawn from commercial beef were cultured in hydrogel modules that could be stacked allowing fusion into larger chunks. We determined the optimal scaffolding and electrical stimulation to promote contractility and anatomical alignment of the muscle tissue to best simulate steak meat.”

Source: Researchers report new approach to cultured meat

Categories
Research

Chinese Consumers’ Attitudes and Potential Acceptance toward Artificial Meat

The interest for artificial meat has recently expanded. However, from the literature, perception of artificial meat in China is not well known. A survey was thus carried out to investigate Chinese attitudes toward artificial meat. The answers of 4666 respondents concluded that 19.9% and 9.6% of them were definitely willing and unwilling to try artificial meat respectively, whereas 47.2% were not willing to eat it regularly, and 87.2% were willing to pay less for it compared to conventional meat. Finally, 52.9% of them will accept artificial meat as an alternative to conventional meat.

Source: Chinese Consumers’ Attitudes and Potential Acceptance toward Artificial Meat – PubMed