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News

Cultured meat: will Europeans eat it?

Consumer acceptance will be crucial to the success of cellular agriculture. But will Europeans be willing to try and buy cultured products? This webinar will explore consumer acceptance of cultured meat in Europe, with a special focus on a study conducted in France and Germany, that ProVeg collaborated on.

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News

Under Discussion: Aristotelian Temperance and Cultured Meat

Admittedly, I’m taking for granted here that the currently standard system of raising creatures in captivity and subjecting them to immense pain simply for the purpose of consuming their flesh is a moral abomination, regardless of how tasty that flesh might be. If cultured meat offers the most realistic opportunity to prevent widespread nonhuman animal suffering, then that alone is sufficient reason to explore its viability. But the implications of our diet for our character (and what we care about) is also important to consider, even once creaturely suffering is diminished.

Source: Under Discussion: Aristotelian Temperance and Cultured Meat – The Prindle Post

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Compagnies and key players

HCS Pharma is part of the European consortium ScaLABle-MEAT with the BIOMIMESYS® technology

The ScaLABle-MEAT project, founded by Eurostar program, will develop a technology to produce lab-grown meat based on Nobel prize winning stem cell technology. The consortium is composed of four European companies: Meatable (Holland), Bit Bio (UK), Ebers (Spain) and HCS Pharma (France). It will deliver a technology platform consisting of bovine cell lines that are easily transformed into fat and muscle cells, a highly efficient cell expansion process, and a tailor-made bioreactor-scaffold combination to generate pieces of meat.

Source: HCS Pharma is part of the European consortium ScaLABle-MEAT with the BIOMIMESYS® technology

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Research

Baby pangolins on my plate: possible lessons to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic

In particular, a crucial role may have been played by the bushmeat-euphoria and attached elitist gastronomies and conspicuous consumption phenomena. The COVID-19 pandemic will likely require ethnobiologists to reschedule research agendas and to envision new epistemological trajectories aimed at more effectively mitigating the mismanagement of natural resources that ultimately threats our and other beings’ existence.

Source: Baby pangolins on my plate: possible lessons to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic

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Compagnies and key players

What Is Lab-Grown Shrimp?

Shiok Meats grows its product by taking shrimp cells and keeping them at a temperature of 28 degrees Celsius. They are then given nutrients in a solution. The cells become meat in four to six weeks.This lab-grown meat’s price is high. One kilogram of it now costs $5,000, said Shiok Meats’ Chief Executive Sandhya Sriram.

Source: What Is Lab-Grown Shrimp?

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Research

Making Sense of Making Meat: Key Moments in the First 20 Years of Tissue Engineering Muscle to Make Food

This paper draws upon three separately conducted research portfolios on CM. Stephens has been tracking the CM community since 2008, and has attended most major events in that time, as well as conducting 42 interviews with professionals working in the field between 2010 and 2013, and is currently conducting a second comparative set of interviews in 2018/9. He has also conducted media analysis of public reporting during this period. Sexton has researched the CM community since 2013, focussing particularly on activities based in and around the San Francisco Bay Area in California, US (otherwise known as “Silicon Valley”). She is engaged in ongoing fieldwork within this region and has conducted 30 interviews with professionals directly working in and affiliated with the field between 2014 and 2018. She has also conducted qualitative analysis on the online narratives of the CM field.

Source: Frontiers | Making Sense of Making Meat: Key Moments in the First 20 Years of Tissue Engineering Muscle to Make Food | Sustainable Food Systems