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Research

Chinese Consumers’ Attitudes and Potential Acceptance toward Artificial Meat – PubMed

The interest for artificial meat has recently expanded. However, from the literature, perception of artificial meat in China is not well known. A survey was thus carried out to investigate Chinese attitudes toward artificial meat. The answers of 4666 respondents concluded that 19.9% and 9.6% of them were definitely willing and unwilling to try artificial meat respectively, whereas 47.2% were not willing to eat it regularly, and 87.2% were willing to pay less for it compared to conventional meat

Source: Chinese Consumers’ Attitudes and Potential Acceptance toward Artificial Meat – PubMed

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Compagnies and key players

Meat Giant to Bring Aleph Farms’ Lab-Grown Meat to Brazil

This week, food company BRF, S.A.—one of the largest meat suppliers in the world—signed a deal with Israel-based cultured meat company Aleph Farms to bring its innovative lab-grown meat to Brazil. Under the Memorandum of Understanding agreement, BRF will co-develop and produce lab-grown meat in one of Aleph Farms’ BioFarm platforms. While traditional animal agriculture requires many inputs and produces large amounts of greenhouse gases, Aleph Farms’ approach relies on a few animal cells that are grown in a bioreactor to create meat without the need to slaughter animals and with a much smaller environmental footprint.

Source: Meat Giant to Bring Aleph Farms’ Lab-Grown Meat to Brazil

Categories
Market

Accelerating Innovation of Alternative Meat

So it’s understandable that Brown of Impossible Foods, and others in the alternative meat industry, are bullish on the idea that their products are the future of meat. As more people become aware of the climatic, environmental, and ethical issues of livestock agriculture, further sales increases are likely. But despite a half-decade of growth that outpaced the meat industry, alternative meats still make up less than 1% of total meat sales in the United States, and an equally low, if not lower, percentage globally. Projections by the Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return Initiative that alternative proteins—including milk and egg alternatives—could exceed half of the entire protein market by 2060 seem at best wishful right now.

Source: Accelerating Innovation of Alternative Meat

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Compagnies and key players

Aleph Farms and Mitsubishi Bring Cultivated Meat to Japan

We’re excited to announce that we signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Mitsubishi Corporation’s Food Industry Group to bring cultivated meat to the Japanese table. We will provide our proven, scalable manufacturing platform (BioFarm™) for cultivation of whole-muscle steaks. Mitsubishi Corporation will provide its expertise in biotechnology processes, branded food manufacturing, and local distribution channels in Japan.

Source: Aleph Farms and Mitsubishi Bring Cultivated Meat to Japan | by Aleph Farms | Jan, 2021 | Medium

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Compagnies and key players

World’s First Approval of Cultivated Meat Sales

Eat Just, Inc., which last month also revealed plans to jointly open their largest plant protein isolate production facility in Singapore, appears to be the first company to have secured such cultivated meat approval. According to SFA, Eat Just’s cultivated chicken was recently allowed to be sold in Singapore as an ingredient in the company’s chicken bites. Other products reportedly in the pipeline include Shiok Meats’ cultivated shrimp and Ants Innovate’s cultivated meat.

Source: BREAKING: World’s First Approval of Cultivated Meat Sales | The Good Food Institute Asia-Pacific- Imagine a Better Way to Meat.

Categories
Market

Cultured Meat Market to Witness Unprecedented Growth in Coming Years

According to MarketsandMarkets, the global cultured meat market is estimated to be valued at USD 214 million in 2025 and is projected to reach USD 593 million by 2032, recording a CAGR of 15.7% from 2025 to 2032 in the normal scenario. The growth of this market is attributed to the startups that are entering the market, owing to the increasing number of investors, such as Cargill and Tyson Foods.

Source: Cultured Meat Market to Witness Unprecedented Growth in Coming Y – FOX 40 WICZ TV – News, Sports, Weather, Contests & More

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Market

The Protein Gap

Whilst the future remains to be seen – one overriding fact in support of the alt-meat and food-tech sector is that to meet climate change targets something simply has to change. If consumers want to maintain their levels of meat consumption (including meat analogues), and the world population follows projected growth rates, perhaps rapid adoption of these innovations is the most credible solution currently presented.

Source: The Protein Gap – ClearlySo

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Market

The next challenge for plant-based meat: Winning the price war against animal meat

Having won the first battle — getting consumers interested enough to try plant-based foods, and investors interested enough to fund them — plant-based meat companies are setting their sights on a bigger challenge: getting plant-based meat products as cheap as animal meat products are. The plant-based meat industry has to be bigger to compete with animal products on price — and competing on price is a key component of getting bigger as an industry.

Source: The next challenge for plant-based meat: Winning the price war against animal meat – Vox

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Market

Alternative meat and dairy companies are raking in investment

“Cultivated” or “cell-based” meat companies, growing food from animal cells, raised 417% more than in all of 2019. In part, it’s a continuation of a long-term trend. “2019 really appeared to be the tipping point where plant-based meat shifted into the mainstream,” says Caroline Bushnell, associate director of corporate engagement at the Good Food Institute. “Not only did we see the major meat companies debut plant-based product lines—pretty much all of them, from Tyson, to Hormel, to Smithfield—but iconic American restaurant chains like Burger King and Dunkin Donuts added plant-based meats to their menus, and retail sales grew double digits. So the momentum coming into this moment was already really strong.”

Source: Alternative meat and dairy companies are raking in investment

Categories
Market

What’s Next for the Alternative Meat Industry?

Consider the combination of the crops being used: soy, wheat, and pea protein are the most typical. This invokes the debate about wheat versus soy, about GMO versus non-GMO. As the plant-based movement shifted to the mainstream, it became a product that wasn’t just for vegans and vegetarians. People started looking at fat and sodium content. People cited the environmental impact. Yes, alternative meats use less water and land, but these are still monocrops. There’s a lot of noise coming from non-GMO activists as well as the traditional protein industry pointing out what can be seen as the “weaknesses” of alternative meats. As the category grows and competition speeds up, that’s only likely to increase.

Source: What’s Next for the Alternative Meat Industry? – GLG