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Compagnies and key players

MeaTech: “We Believe Cultured Meat Will Ultimately Change the Relationship Between Food Production and Agriculture” 

The company believes in the potential for cultured meat to have a dramatic impact on business models, products, consumer habits, and sustainability. Developing such technology requires a great deal of expertise across a range of disciplines and we believe that enabling the production of cultured meat by licensing the production technologies is a powerful way to accelerate widespread adoption.

Source: MeaTech: “We Believe Cultured Meat Will Ultimately Change the Relationship Between Food Production and Agriculture” – vegconomist – the vegan business magazine

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Market

Europe? The U.S.? Israel? Which Country Might Be Next to Approve Cultured Meat

The question was asked again this week when an article from Food Navigator zeroed in on Europe, noting, “Europeans want to know when it will be their turn: when will cultivated meat be served on EU plates?” It seems the most probable answer is three to five years.

Source: Europe? The U.S.? Israel? Which Country Might Be Next to Approve Cultured Meat

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Compagnies and key players

Cell-based caviar: the mass-market health food star of the future?

Caviar is renowned as an exclusive luxury typically only enjoyed by champagne-swilling elites in five-star suites or on-board first-class flights or cruises. But it’s also one of the easiest foods to grow in a lab. So says Kenneth Benning, the refined CEO of Exmoor Caviar – famous as the UK’s first sturgeon caviar farm. It has been operating in the picturesque English countryside in Devon since 2012 and now supplies its products into leading hotels and over 80 Michelin-starred restaurants.

Source: Cell-based caviar: the mass-market health food star of the future?

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Research

Chinese Consumers’ Attitudes and Potential Acceptance toward Artificial Meat – PubMed

The interest for artificial meat has recently expanded. However, from the literature, perception of artificial meat in China is not well known. A survey was thus carried out to investigate Chinese attitudes toward artificial meat. The answers of 4666 respondents concluded that 19.9% and 9.6% of them were definitely willing and unwilling to try artificial meat respectively, whereas 47.2% were not willing to eat it regularly, and 87.2% were willing to pay less for it compared to conventional meat

Source: Chinese Consumers’ Attitudes and Potential Acceptance toward Artificial Meat – PubMed

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Compagnies and key players

Meat Giant to Bring Aleph Farms’ Lab-Grown Meat to Brazil

This week, food company BRF, S.A.—one of the largest meat suppliers in the world—signed a deal with Israel-based cultured meat company Aleph Farms to bring its innovative lab-grown meat to Brazil. Under the Memorandum of Understanding agreement, BRF will co-develop and produce lab-grown meat in one of Aleph Farms’ BioFarm platforms. While traditional animal agriculture requires many inputs and produces large amounts of greenhouse gases, Aleph Farms’ approach relies on a few animal cells that are grown in a bioreactor to create meat without the need to slaughter animals and with a much smaller environmental footprint.

Source: Meat Giant to Bring Aleph Farms’ Lab-Grown Meat to Brazil

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Market

Accelerating Innovation of Alternative Meat

So it’s understandable that Brown of Impossible Foods, and others in the alternative meat industry, are bullish on the idea that their products are the future of meat. As more people become aware of the climatic, environmental, and ethical issues of livestock agriculture, further sales increases are likely. But despite a half-decade of growth that outpaced the meat industry, alternative meats still make up less than 1% of total meat sales in the United States, and an equally low, if not lower, percentage globally. Projections by the Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return Initiative that alternative proteins—including milk and egg alternatives—could exceed half of the entire protein market by 2060 seem at best wishful right now.

Source: Accelerating Innovation of Alternative Meat

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Compagnies and key players

Aleph Farms and Mitsubishi Bring Cultivated Meat to Japan

We’re excited to announce that we signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Mitsubishi Corporation’s Food Industry Group to bring cultivated meat to the Japanese table. We will provide our proven, scalable manufacturing platform (BioFarm™) for cultivation of whole-muscle steaks. Mitsubishi Corporation will provide its expertise in biotechnology processes, branded food manufacturing, and local distribution channels in Japan.

Source: Aleph Farms and Mitsubishi Bring Cultivated Meat to Japan | by Aleph Farms | Jan, 2021 | Medium

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Compagnies and key players

World’s First Approval of Cultivated Meat Sales

Eat Just, Inc., which last month also revealed plans to jointly open their largest plant protein isolate production facility in Singapore, appears to be the first company to have secured such cultivated meat approval. According to SFA, Eat Just’s cultivated chicken was recently allowed to be sold in Singapore as an ingredient in the company’s chicken bites. Other products reportedly in the pipeline include Shiok Meats’ cultivated shrimp and Ants Innovate’s cultivated meat.

Source: BREAKING: World’s First Approval of Cultivated Meat Sales | The Good Food Institute Asia-Pacific- Imagine a Better Way to Meat.

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Market

Cultured Meat Market to Witness Unprecedented Growth in Coming Years

According to MarketsandMarkets, the global cultured meat market is estimated to be valued at USD 214 million in 2025 and is projected to reach USD 593 million by 2032, recording a CAGR of 15.7% from 2025 to 2032 in the normal scenario. The growth of this market is attributed to the startups that are entering the market, owing to the increasing number of investors, such as Cargill and Tyson Foods.

Source: Cultured Meat Market to Witness Unprecedented Growth in Coming Y – FOX 40 WICZ TV – News, Sports, Weather, Contests & More

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Market

The Protein Gap

Whilst the future remains to be seen – one overriding fact in support of the alt-meat and food-tech sector is that to meet climate change targets something simply has to change. If consumers want to maintain their levels of meat consumption (including meat analogues), and the world population follows projected growth rates, perhaps rapid adoption of these innovations is the most credible solution currently presented.

Source: The Protein Gap – ClearlySo