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Other alternatives to meat

Revo Foods unveils 3D-printed plant-based salmon

Austrian-based Revo Foods announced on Facebook it will host what it believes is the ‘world’s first’ public tasting event for its 3D-printed, plant-based ‘Salmon with Attitude’ at a restaurant in Vienna on 6 March. “​The future of seafood has arrived!”​ it wrote. “After countless of hours spent on R&D, we are happy to announce that the world’s first 3D-printed plant-based seafood is here!”​ The company is the result of a student project looking at ways to commercialize vegan alternatives to salmon and tuna in Europe​.

Source: Revo Foods unveils 3D-printed plant-based salmon

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Compagnies and key players

Redefine Meat Raises a $29M Series A Round for its 3D-Printed Plant-Based Meats

Israeli plant-based meat startup Redefine Meat announced today that it has closed a $29 million Series A round of funding. The round was led by Happiness Capital and Hanaco Ventures with participation from CPT Capital, Losa Group, Sake Bosch, and K3 Ventures. This brings the total amount raised by Redefine to $35 million.

Source: Redefine Meat Raises a $29M Series A Round for its 3D-Printed Plant-Based Meats

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Compagnies and key players

KFC is working with a Russian 3D bioprinting firm to try to make lab-produced chicken nuggets

“3D bioprinting technologies, initially widely recognized in medicine, are nowadays gaining popularity in producing foods such as meat,” Yusef Khesuani, co-founder of 3D Bioprinting Solutions said in a statement announcing the KFC partnership. “In the future, the rapid development of such technologies will allow us to make 3D-printed meat products more accessible and we are hoping that the technology created as a result of our cooperation with KFC will help accelerate the launch of cell-based meat products on the market.”

Source: KFC is working with a Russian 3D bioprinting firm to try to make lab-produced chicken nuggets – The Verge

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Compagnies and key players

Coming soon to a 3D printer near you: Plant-based steaks

“You need a 3D printer to mimic the structure of the muscle of the animal,” CEO Eshchar Ben-Shitrit told Reuters. The machines to be launched next year will be able to print 20kg an hour and eventually hundreds, at a lower cost than real meat. Founded in 2018, the company raised $6 million last year in a round led by CPT Capital, an investor in Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods. Hanaco Venture Capital and German poultry group PHW also invested.

Source: Coming soon to a 3D printer near you: Plant-based steaks

Categories
Compagnies and key players

Nova Meat: “The Future of Alternative Meat Will Not be Black or White, But a Variety of Hybrids”

In our case, our microextrusion technology is based on an advanced strategy, borrowed from tissue engineering, which is able to biohack highly-proteic plant-based compositions and process them at the micro- and nanometric levels, to achieve products that mimic a variety of whole muscle cuts. Once scaled at industrial level with faster extruding machines, our microextrusion technology will give plant-based meat manufacturers the tools to create different textures from a wide variety of ingredients, to mimic several types of meat and seafood. In fact, traditional technologies such as low and high-moisture extrusion work well for some applications, but these methods are not ideal for mimicking all types of animal meat and fish.

Source: Nova Meat: “The Future of Alternative Meat Will Not be Black or White, But a Variety of Hybrids” – vegconomist – the vegan business magazine

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News

How do you like your beef… old-style cow or 3D-printed?

Printed meat could be on European restaurant menus from next year as Israeli and Spanish firms serve up realistic beef and chicken produced from plant protein. And, within a few years, the printers are likely to be available to buy so that consumers can produce their own at home.Layers of material are built up by 3D printers until there is a solid object conforming to very precise specifications. The meat can be produced either from vegetable matter or from animal cells grown in a lab. The printer uses these raw ingredients, which come in a Nespresso-style cartridge, to build up a steak or chicken fillet that tastes like the real thing.

Source: How do you like your beef… old-style cow or 3D-printed? | Technology | The Guardian