Categories
Research

What’s the carbon footprint of lab-grown meat?

If a large new production facility runs on renewable energy, the carbon footprint of cultivated meat would be lower than conventional beef, pork, and chicken. The analysis calculates that the footprint is roughly 92% lower than beef, 52% lower than pork, and 17% lower than chicken, even if the conventional meat is produced in ways that are more sustainable than what’s standard now—for example, changing feed so cattle burp less methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

Source: What’s the carbon footprint of lab-grown meat?

Categories
Market

Cultured Meat Market to Witness Unprecedented Growth in Coming Years

According to MarketsandMarkets, the global cultured meat market is estimated to be valued at USD 214 million in 2025 and is projected to reach USD 593 million by 2032, recording a CAGR of 15.7% from 2025 to 2032 in the normal scenario. The growth of this market is attributed to the startups that are entering the market, owing to the increasing number of investors, such as Cargill and Tyson Foods.

Source: Cultured Meat Market to Witness Unprecedented Growth in Coming Y – FOX 40 WICZ TV – News, Sports, Weather, Contests & More

Categories
Market Research

European Markets for Cultured Meat: A Comparison of Germany and France

Substantial markets for cultured meat exist in both countries, although German consumers are significantly more open to the concept than the French. Strikingly, cultured meat acceptance is significantly higher amongst agricultural and meat workers, indicating that those who are closest to existing meat production methods are most likely to prefer alternatives. We found some evidence that pro-cultured meat messages, which focus on antibiotic resistance and food safety, are significantly more persuasive than those that focus on animals or the environment.

Source: Foods | Free Full-Text | European Markets for Cultured Meat: A Comparison of Germany and France

Categories
Market

Gen Z not ready to eat lab-grown meat: 72% of Gen Z don’t want to eat it

“The respondents were effectively divided into two groups: the “against” described cultured meat as “another thing our generation has to worry about” and questioned the motivations of those developing it, while supporters described it as “money invested for a good cause” and “a smart move” by people who are “advanced thinkers.”

Source: Gen Z not ready to eat lab-grown meat: 72% of Gen Z don’t want to eat it — ScienceDaily

Categories
Research

The effect of information content on acceptance of cultured meat in a tasting context

We observed that provision of information and the tasting experience increased acceptance of cultured meat and that information on personal benefits of cultured meat increased acceptance more than information on quality and taste but not than societal benefits of cultured meat. Previous awareness of cultured meat was the best predictor of its acceptance. In contrast to previous studies, sex and social economic status were not associated with different acceptance rates.

Source: The effect of information content on acceptance of cultured meat in a tasting context