Categories
Laws, ethics and lobbies

Farmers expect rapid growth for plant-based meats, but don’t like it

Half of the farmers surveyed by Purdue University said plant-based proteins could hold up to 10% of the meat market in five years and some expected the share to be much larger. Most of the respondents to the Ag Economy Barometer poll said they would not grow crops for processing into a meat alternative, even if they were offered a contract, said Purdue on Tuesday. And the same portion, just above 60%, said there would be a damaging decline in U.S. farm income if plant-based meats reached a 25% market share.

Source: Farmers expect rapid growth for plant-based meats, but don’t like it | Successful Farming

Categories
Market

Accelerating Innovation of Alternative Meat

So it’s understandable that Brown of Impossible Foods, and others in the alternative meat industry, are bullish on the idea that their products are the future of meat. As more people become aware of the climatic, environmental, and ethical issues of livestock agriculture, further sales increases are likely. But despite a half-decade of growth that outpaced the meat industry, alternative meats still make up less than 1% of total meat sales in the United States, and an equally low, if not lower, percentage globally. Projections by the Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return Initiative that alternative proteins—including milk and egg alternatives—could exceed half of the entire protein market by 2060 seem at best wishful right now.

Source: Accelerating Innovation of Alternative Meat

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Compagnies and key players

Cell-cultured meat gamechanger? Matrix Meats to showcase nanofiber scaffolding in ‘solid meat product’ this year

Matrix Meats – an Ohio-based startup developing customizable nanofiber scaffolds for cell-cultured meat production – will showcase a prototype “solid meat product such as a thin piece of steak” in partnership with a cultured meat co by the end of this year as a demonstration of its technology, billed as a potential gamechanger in the nascent industry.

The beauty of Matrix Meats – which develops edible scaffolding around which cells can seed, creating meaty 3D structures – is that it enables firms to grow and proliferate cells (the first stage of any cell-cultured meat process) and then differentiate them into various cell types such as muscle and fat (the second stage of the process), much more rapidly… all in a single bioreactor.

Source: Cell-cultured meat gamechanger? Matrix Meats to showcase nanofiber scaffolding in ‘solid meat product’ this year

Categories
Research

Alberta researchers working on lab-grown meat

A burger patty that gets its start in a petri dish instead of in a slaughterhouse may still seem to be the stuff of science fiction. But with industry insiders suggesting lab-grown meat will be a consumer reality sooner rather than later, advocates say Alberta has the chance to be a part of a new industry with major disruption potential.

Source: Alberta researchers working on lab-grown meat | Calgary Herald

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Compagnies and key players

Two Austin Women Hope to Build the First Lab-Grown Brisket

That’s when Kam expects BioBQ, the company she started with cofounder Janet Zoldan in late 2018, will harvest its first lab-grown brisket. Kam and Zoldan want the world’s first lab-grown barbecue to be produced or, as they describe it, “cultivated,” in Austin.

Source: Two Austin Women Hope to Build the First Lab-Grown Brisket – Texas Monthly

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Compagnies and key players

Cell-based meat start-up New Age Meats secures additional funding

US cell-based firm New Age Meats has secured US$2m from investors just six months after raising $2.7m in seed funding from a consortium of backers.The California company said the new seed extension funding will help it to continue to develop cell-based, or cultivated, pork products.

Source: Cell-based meat start-up New Age Meats secures additional funding | Food Industry News | just-food

Categories
News

Opinion | Is Meat Grown in a Lab Really Meat?

Revising our understanding of meat to make room for in vitro meat involves a similar move. We should strip down our understanding of meat so that an element previously deemed essential — in this case, being sourced in an animal carcass — is no longer strictly necessary. On this updated, more minimalist understanding, all that is necessary for something to qualify as meat is that it has a meaty substance and function. Just as Model Ts and Teslas both qualify as cars, animal-sourced and lab-grown versions would then both qualify as real meat.

Source: Opinion | Is Meat Grown in a Lab Really Meat? – The New York Times

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Other alternatives to meat

Impossible Foods’ business booms as demand for plant-based meat grows

“Starbucks’ commitment to add more plant-based ingredients to its menu is a new benchmark for large corporations,” said Dr. Patrick O. Brown, founder and CEO of Impossible Foods. Meatless mania heats up as Starbucks debuts Impossible breakfast sandwichMichael Kobori, chief sustainability officer at Starbucks, said this is part of the company’s sustainability initiatives and an effort to meet increasing customer demand for plant-based options.

Source: Impossible Foods’ business booms as demand for plant-based meat grows

Categories
Other alternatives to meat

King Soopers adds Impossible Burgers to plant-based protein offerings

A King Soopers representative confirmed that Colorado’s dominant grocery chain began selling Impossible’s vegan product on Tuesday. It can be found in the “plant-based” section of each store’s meat department and does not come frozen.King Soopers already offers Beyond Meat products, a competing plant-based meat substitute.

Source: King Soopers adds Impossible Burgers to plant-based protein offerings

Categories
Laws, ethics and lobbies

FDA and USDA Could Strengthen Existing Efforts to Prepare for Oversight of Cell-Cultured Meat

Soon, people will likely be able to buy cell-cultured meat. To make it, food animals are biopsied and their cells banked, or stored, for use. Then the meat is grown from the cells, harvested, and made into food products. Specifics on the process and the composition of the final product aren’t publicly available.The FDA and USDA are responsible for food safety and have started oversight work on cell-cultured meat. But they haven’t followed all leading practices for interagency collaboration. Improving how they work together can help them use their resources more efficiently.Our recommendations address this and other issues we found.

Source: U.S. GAO – Food Safety: FDA and USDA Could Strengthen Existing Efforts to Prepare for Oversight of Cell-Cultured Meat